Don’t Talk Yourself Out of a Sale

Do you ever feel like there is something lost in translation during your sales presentations? Do you need someone in your firm to play translator between you and your prospect?

Too often, sales presentations are riddled with technical jargon that simply confuses your potential client. A study actually found that only 3% of prospects fully understood most of the terms used in the various sales presentations they were given. This is not a very promising statistic.

Are you or someone at your firm guilty of this?

Remember, you are not speaking to your competition. If a prospect knew all of this information already, they wouldn’t need you. So make sure you are speaking the language of the buyer, not your industry or your competition. The same can be said for your website, as well. If the content of your website, collateral or sales presentation is littered with industry jargon you may be needlessly losing prospects.

So don’t make the sales process harder than it already is. Speak in such a way that your prospect will actually understand what you are trying to say to them.

If you have any questions, contact Springboard Business Development by calling 410-832-7560 or click here today!

At Springboard we offer outsourced sales solutions for businesses in the professional services arena. It’s simple, while you focus on delivery, we bring our sales expertise and connections to focus on your business development challenges.

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter as well!

Sources:

Language that Kills Sales

How to Tell if Your Investment in a Networking Group has Paid Off

Do networking groups really work?

How can you track their effectiveness?

Will they really help you grow your business?

These are just a few of the questions members of networking groups continue to ask themselves week after week, meeting after meeting. They want to know if it is all worth it. So how can you measure the success of your networking groups? For starters, keep track of…

•      The number of leads you generate through Business Networking activities.

•      How many new partnerships resulted from your Business Networking activities.

•      Most Importantly, has any of this resulted in an increase in business?

In the end, the only thing that matters is your return on investment (ROI). So if these networking groups are not resulting in more business, then why deal with them? But these groups obviously work for some people, or they would not still be attended.

So maybe the problem isn’t the networking group, maybe it is the networker, aka you.

The trick is to know HOW to deal with networking groups. Remember, these groups are not a magical way to gain business. They require work. They require you to build relationships. If you only attend meetings to receive business, expecting an immediate increase in revenue, than you will go home disappointed.

As one article put it, its netWORKING, not net WAITING.

Instead, take the time to connect with people. Learn who they are, not just what they do. And most importantly, ask how you can help support them. If you are not giving referrals to others, what incentive do they have to give referrals to you? So help foster a relationship that is mutually beneficial.

But don’t just end your interaction at your networking event. Have a follow up plan: maybe a phone call, email, personal note, or a follow up meeting. Continue to build upon the relationship you started cultivating at the networking event. Let them know you enjoyed talking with them and will think of people to connect them with (and ask them to do the same for you).

In the end, people do business with other people. To be more specific, they do business with other people that they like. So get out there and start cultivating mutually beneficial business relationships!

If you have any questions, contact Springboard Business Development by calling 410-832-7560 or click here today!

At Springboard we offer outsourced sales solutions for businesses in the professional services arena. It’s simple, while you focus on delivery, we bring our sales expertise and connections to focus on your business development challenges.

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter as well!

Sources:

Networking Groups – Do They Work? BizNik.com

 

Business is All About Building the Relationship

Revenue is made from transactions.

Businesses grow through relationships.

Relationships build long term business, while transactions are just about the present. Today’s buyers are looking for someone they can trust, someone who delivers.  If you sell for the transaction your customer is treated like a commodity. So you must build the relationship first, then make the sale. This shows your customer respect and will have them coming back to you the next time they have a need.

Remember, a single sale is nice, but steady business is the key to long-term success. So engage with your potential client and dig deeper. Get to know your client, his/her company, and company’s needs.

Respect is at the heart of building business relationships. As one article put it, respect is the “glue that holds together the functioning of teams, partnerships and managing relationships.”

Too often, salespeople go into meetings and focus on their product, throwing information and sales figures at their potential client. But, in the end, clients buy relationships, not products. This means that it’s less about your product and a whole lot more about how you connect and engage with your client.

In the end, no matter how objective your potential client may be, when it comes to choosing a supplier or business partner, most people prefer someone they know.

If you have any questions, contact Springboard Business Development by calling 410-832-7560 or click here today!

At Springboard we offer outsourced sales solutions for businesses in the professional services arena. It’s simple, while you focus on delivery, we bring our sales expertise and connections to focus on your business development challenges.

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter as well!

Sources:
Business Relationships LeadingInsight.com

Business Relationship Management ImpactFactory.com

How to Build Relationships for Business Success Suite101.com

 

Differences Between the Commercial and Federal Markets

The commercial and federal markets are not as different as you may think. In both sectors, the concept is the same; people buy products and services. But there are also several differences, as well. These include:

•      The language of federal contracting is often difficult to interpret

•      Federal buying rules and contract compliance requirements are littered with red tape.

•      Proposal writing is different in the federal market.

•      Once you have a contract with the federal government, figuring out the reporting requirements, how to stay in contract compliance, and which contract clauses are important and which you can more or less ignore is difficult to discern without guidance.

But aside from the red tape and confusing federal contracts, there are two major reasons why many companies find it difficult to do business in the federal market…

1.   Established federal vendors have already built relationships with end users.

2.   The federal market is huge and it can take a company upwards of a year or more to find the right opportunities.

If you can’t get your foot in the door, you can’t make that all-important sale.

So if you want to crack the federal market, but don’t know where to start, put your trust in a company who has been there before, a company with a proven track record for success, like Springboard.

At Springboard we offer outsourced sales solutions for businesses in the professional services arena. It’s simple, while you focus on delivery, we bring our sales expertise and connections to focus on your business development challenges.

If you have any questions about outsourcing, contact Springboard Business Development by calling 410-832-7560 or click here today!

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter as well!

Sources:

Comparing the Commercial and Federal Markets FedMarket.com

Bridge the Culture Gap Between Commercial & Federal Markets PressKing.com

Building a United Sales Team

If your business is built around sales, you have undoubtedly had to address the following question; is it better to build a sales team that works together or one that is in constant competition? Yes, competition can be a good thing, but a sales force that acts like a team can be far more productive than one with inherent competition.

The trick, however, is to promote both teamwork and competition. How is that possible? You must motivate your sales team with a group goal – perhaps an end of the year trip or a cash bonus. Whatever you do, you must make it about the team and not about individual accolades. If your sales team spends all its energy fighting against each other, they won’t have much energy or time left to fight for your customers.

It is okay to encourage competition; however, you can never let it compromise what you stand for as individuals and as a company. Competition is healthy when the team is bound with mutual respect and a common goal. If you accomplish this, you will have built a sales team focused on sales and profitability and not on direct competition with one another.

It is also important, however, to treat each sales person individually. The truth is that most professional sales people have big egos. That is just the way it is. Salespeople want to hear that they are performing well. But you cannot ignore the “weak link,” either. You need to encourage weaker sales staff and show them support. After all, your sales team is only as strong as its weakest link. And since your entire team is working towards one goal, they should also be more receptive to helping out one another. So, as you can see, a unified team is a strong team.

It’s a simple formula on paper, but can be very challenging to carry out.

At the end of the day, the success of your sales team comes down to how THEY measure success. Happy customers? Profit? Gross sales? Annuity revenue? Loyalty? Entrepreneurialism? Work ethic? Passion? Or individual accolades?

So be sure your sales team is working towards the right goal(s) – profit, customer satisfaction, business growth, etc.

If you have any questions about outsourcing, contact Springboard by calling 410-832-7560 or click here today!

At Springboard we offer outsourced sales solutions for businesses in the professional services arena. It’s simple, while you focus on delivery, we bring our sales expertise and connections to focus on your business development challenges.

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter as well!

Sources:

Sales Manager Tips :How To Manage Sales People ManagingSalesPeople.com

Should I Encourage Competition Among My Sales Team? SmartCompany.com